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Fast & Street Food Course

There are inexpensive and easy meals in Japan, such as yakisoba and okonomiyaki. These meals are simple, very popular, and easy to prepare. They are often sold at home parties and festival stalls. In this course, you will be taught the staple meals and the popular snack meals, and the latest trendy and visually appealing sweets, updated from time to time.

Recipe example:

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Yakisoba

Yakisoba in Japan is common as home menu and restaurant menu. Even outdoors, even if it is outdoor, it is sold in various places such as simulated shops / kiosks of events such as street vendors, school festivals, etc., as well as cooking possibilities and cooking procedures as long as there is one iron plate.

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Takoyaki

Takoyaki is a ball-shaped Japanese snack made of a wheat flour-based batter and cooked in a special molded pan. It is typically filled with minced or diced octopus (tako), tempura scraps (tenkasu), pickled ginger, and green onion.Takoyaki are brushed with takoyaki sauce (similar to Worcestershire sauce) and mayonnaise, and then sprinkled with green laver (aonori) and shavings of dried bonito. There are many variations to the takoyaki recipe, for example, ponzu (soy sauce with dashi and citrus vinegar), goma-dare (sesame-and-vinegar sauce) or vinegared dashi.

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Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki is a unique Japanese "unsweetened pancake" that has become so popular that there are local flavors all over the country, not to mention the two most famous cities, Hiroshima and Osaka. As the name implies, you can make with ingredients of your choice, but the one thing they have in common is that they use a flour-based batter and plenty of cabbage. By adding meat, eggs, seafood, or other ingredients of your choice, you can make a healthy and satisfying dish. You can have your okonomiyaki cooked on the hot grill or cook it yourself at specialty restaurants. You can arrange the okonomiyaki according to the ingredients you add and how you cook it, but don't forget about the addictive okonomiyaki sauce. The ingredients for okonomiyaki are inexpensive and easy to find, so it is guaranteed to be easy to make even after you return home. In this article, let's learn how to make the basic recipe.

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Oden

Stewed oden with various ingredients such as daikon, egg, konnyaku, chikuwa, etc., is a prevalent dish at food stalls and izakaya taverns served with sake. It is also made at home during the winter. In addition, convenience stores in Japan sell oden with their original recipes in the fall, just as the oden season arrives. Oden is what Japanese people want to eat when it gets cold. The soup base, soup stock ingredients, seasoning (soy sauce, miso, etc.), and ingredients used to cook the soup are all local and oden in Tokyo, Kansai, and Shizuoka, the home of JCI, is a must-try.

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Gyudon(Beef Bowl)

Gyudon has become known as the "Beef Bowl" due to the overseas expansion of big chains. The sweet and savory soy sauce-based seasoning, the flavor seeping out from the ultra-thin slices of beef, and the rice are a perfect match. You can prepare it quickly with simple ingredients, and its primary selling point is that it satisfies the stomach. Some people enjoy changing the taste by adding pickled red ginger, spring onion, kimchi, and a raw egg. It is a simple one-bowl dish, but the secret of its popularity is that it can produce variations with toppings and the amount of juice.

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Yakitori

In Japan, yakitori can be enjoyed in various settings, from upscale restaurants to street stalls. Japanese people casually enjoy yakitori both at home and at restaurants. In particular, yakitori stalls are always crowded with people after work, as it is a trendy snack to accompany Japanese sake. For yakitori, yakitori masters use various parts of different breeds of chickens and skewer then grill to perfection, crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside. It is a perfect snack to go with sake or beer. If you can cook yakitori skillfully, you are one step closer to becoming a true connoisseur of Washoku!

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Karaage(Japanese fried chicken)

The number of restaurants specializing in take-out has increased dramatically in the past few years. It is fried chicken arranged in Japanese style. The seasoning is usually soy sauce based with garlic and ginger, but salt, curry, and spicy flavors are also available. The most popular part to use is the juicy thigh meat in Japan. The texture of the batter can also be customized, depending on whether or not flour or eggs are used. The crispy batter and the juicy chicken flavor make karaage a favorite of Japanese people, both as a side dish and snack.

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"New" shaved ice

There is a boom in evolutionary shaved ice that defies stereotypes in Japan. More and more people want to enjoy shaved ice in the hot summer and the warmth of a restaurant in winter. Shaved ice is now available in a wide variety of flavors, including fresh fruit confiture, pumpkin, black sesame, hojicha flavors, mascarpone, fresh cream, chocolate, and rich espresso sauce combined with caramel and pudding. There is a wide variety of flavors to choose from. Why don't you come up with your surprising combinations of shaved ice?

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Candied Strawberry

A specialty store appeared in Shibuya, Tokyo, a city of young people, and the evolving strawberry candy quickly spread all over Japan, making it very popular for eating while walking around. The cute appearance of strawberry candy spread through Instagram and other media, and its popularity among young people as a new snack in Japan accelerated rapidly. A new type of strawberry candy is now available with toppings such as cheesecake, tiramisu, and green tea tart. The secret of its popularity is enjoying the strawberry juice when you feel the crisp outer coating. The combination with grapes or other fruits depends on your ideas.

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Dumplings on skewers

Skewered dumplings are the most casually eaten Japanese sweets. Since the Edo period, dumplings on skewers have been a popular Japanese snack among people. The appeal of these dumplings lies in the simple, traditional Japanese taste of soy sauce-flavored mitarashi, sweet red bean paste, and mugwort. The skewers make it possible to eat them on the go. The dumplings are made with rice flour made from Uruchi rice. The dumplings can be colored and flavored, and You can adjust the size. Of course, you can add traditional toppings such as red bean paste. Still, you will also learn many variations of your originality, such as baking them with sweet soy sauce or unique toppings to go with the chunky dumplings.

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Mitsumame and Anmitsu

Mitsumame is a Japanese dessert that originated in Japan, consisting of boiled red kidney beans and other beans covered with syrup. Mitsumame topped with red bean paste is called Anmitsu. The most common ingredients are cooked red peas with salt, agar cut into squares, cherries, mandarin oranges, beef skin, and syrup such as kuromitsu or molasses. It can be transformed into "Cream Mitsumame" by adding ice cream, soft ice cream, or fresh cream, "Fruit Mitsumame" by adding more fruits, or "Coffee (or Matcha) Mitsumame" by using agar as coffee (matcha) jelly. The possibilities for unique Japanese desserts from around the world based on Mitsumame are endless.

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Nerikiri

Nerikiri, which are brightly colored shapes of flowers, birds, and scenery of the four seasons, are one of the most sophisticated Japanese sweets that have been sublimated into art. You will create a Nerigiri that is beautiful to look at and smooth to the touch, and refined in its sweetness. Nerikiri is served according to the season, as a confection to be served at celebratory occasions or with koicha (thick tea) in the tea ceremony. Nerikiri dough is based on a paste made from white beans. You can also do the art of Wagashi. At your Japanese-style cafe or your party, your beautiful Nerikiri will surely be the talk of the town. Enjoy it with a tea ceremony.

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Taiyaki

Taiyaki is a Japanese snack that is very familiar to Japanese people. It is a favorite sweet snack of all Japanese children. The standard fillings are anko (sweet red bean paste), custard cream, green tea cream, etc. You can also bake them with fruit, chocolate, cheese, etc. Taiyaki-style okonomiyaki made with okonomiyaki ingredients is also popular. It is fun to watch them baked at the store, and the taste of freshly baked okonomiyaki hot in the wrapper is exceptional. If you plan to set up a store specializing in Japanese snacks, it is highly recommended that you show passersby where you are making the snacks. You can master creating and baking fillings such as anko and Taiyaki batter. Enjoy with sencha tea!

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Fruit Bowl

Make a colorful and fresh fruit cup that makes your fruit taste even better than usual. For those who want to hone their knife skills, this is also an excellent place to learn how to cut and peel fruits in detail and how to cut pretty decorations. For some fruits, you may need to stop the color from changing. You can also learn how to deal with this. Let's make the most of the vivid colors of the fruits to create a gorgeous presentation.

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Strawberry Daifuku

Strawberry Daifuku has evolved into a cute Japanese sweet by adding strawberries to the traditional Japanese Daifuku. When Daifuku was first introduced, it was a white mochi wrapped with red bean paste and strawberries. Still, there have been more variations recently, such as coloring the mochi, adding flavors such as chocolate, or using green tea-flavored bean paste or custard cream instead of the standard red bean paste. In addition to strawberries, you can use kiwis and large grapes. If you learn how to make mochi dough and fillings such as red bean paste that will not harden over time and how to form Daifuku, you will be able to make a variety of Daifuku arrangements.

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Choco Banana & Crepe

Choco bananas are skewered, coated with chocolate, and finished with colorful toppings, and crepes with fruit, cream, and jam are very popular as sweets to eat. It has become a typical street food in Harajuku, bustling with teenagers. The combination of items wrapped in the crepe, the realism of the crepe batter being cooked in front of the customer, and the fragrant, sweet aroma are reasons why crepes remain so popular. In addition to sweet fillings, snack-type arrangements rolled with cheese, ham, etc., are also popular these days. Let's learn how to bake them thinly and make them attractive for presentation.

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Fresh Strawberry Milkshake

Japanese people love bright red strawberries. Takeout stores specializing in strawberry sweets are also becoming a hot topic among young women. Another popular item is the smoothie-like "fresh strawberry milkshake" from Korea, along with strawberry daifuku and strawberry candy. The texture of the fresh strawberries and the pink gradation that makes it Instagram-worthy are so cute that they will make your heart flutter. Strawberry lovers can't get enough of this! You can also use both strawberry jam and fresh strawberries to get two different textures at once. Add a twist to the topping to make it even cuter.

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Fruit sandwiches

Fruit sandwiches are a hot topic on social media because of their "picture-perfect" cross-section. Of course, they are delicious, but the trick is to arrange the fruit so that the cross-section looks beautiful when cut and use the right amount of cream. Also, the cream should not be a sweet batter like a cake but should have a flavor that goes well with the bread and be firm enough to hold the fruit ingredients in the sandwich. We will also teach you how to make sure the cream does not stain the bread or sag over time. You will also learn how to "cut" a sandwich full of fruit and cream neatly. Once you've mastered the basics, you'll be able to arrange them as you please.

The course fee includes the following :
- Entrance fees for the visits included in the program.
- Cooking lessons and meals as mentioned in the program.
- Meals for the walking tour as mentioned in the program.
- Lunch as mentioned in the program.
- English interpretation service (Chinese interpretation service is available upon request)

Not included:
-Transportation to school and between cities, all transportation costs
- Lodging
- Food and beverage expenses not listed in the program
- Personal expenses
- Insurance

1 week (5 days) program - Price
Total: 2,200 USD

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