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Setsubun

In Japan, February 3rd is the day of Setsubun. Setsubun means the ending of winter and the beginning of spring. It has been believed that oni (a devil-like creature from Japanese folklore) comes when the seasons change in Japan. To get rid of the oni, people scatter roasted soy beans both inside and outside of their houses. The phrase “Out with the devil! In with good fortune,” is said when throwing soybeans. Once the beans are thrown, gather them all up and eat the same number of beans as your age.



Ehomaki (Lucky Direction Roll) Ehomaki is a sushi roll that is believed to be good luck when eaten on Setsubun day. This custom began in Western Japan but now it has become a nationwide event. Ehomaki usually have seven ingredients such as cucumber, sweet omelet, shiitake mushroom and eel, which are connected with the Seven Deities of Good Luck.

When eating Ehomaki, you should look at the year’s good luck direction, and eat quietly while making a wish. Ehomaki should not be cut. This represents not cutting any good bonds in the future.



Japanese Cuisine has become a global trend and known as healthy food with seasonal ingredients.

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